Literary Hangover is a podcast, released twice on Saturdays each month, in which Matt Lech and his friends chat about fiction and the historical, social, and political forces behind the creation of it and represented by it.

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  • 38 - The Secret Diary of William Byrd of Westover (1711) - Tuscarora War/Rebellion, Colonel Parke's Estate
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    Get episodes a couple weeks early @ patreon.com/literaryhangover

    Hey everyone! Before we get to Boone, Matt is going to finish William Byrd II's first diary, this time the year 1711. The Tuscarora War, to be viewed as both an indian war *and* a slave rebellion, looms large as does the assassination of Byrd's father-in-law/Governor in Antigua, Colonel Daniel Parke.

    Sources

    NC BOOKWATCH: David LaVere: The Tuscarora War

    https://www.pbs.org/video/david-lavere-the-tuscarora-war-oifrkt/

    The Michael Eure Show - Tri-Racial Identity of Tuscarora & Other Native Americans (12/17/20)

    https://youtu.be/fTge5-us_BU

    The Michael Eure Show - Tri-Racial Identity of Tuscarora & Other Native Americans - Part 2 (1/14/21)

    https://youtu.be/_0KOxlu-6Xk

    Linebaugh, Peter. 2003. The London hanged: crime and civil society in the eighteenth century. London: Verso.

    Apologies for the crispy audio, tried my best to cancel out vacuum noise from the neighbors.

  • 37 - The Secret Diary of William Byrd of Westover (1710)
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    Alex, Grace, and Matt return with year 1710 in the diary of tobacco plantation master William Byrd II, a year marked by spooky mystical dreams, increasing attempts at escape from slaves, and Whig vs Tory political battle.

    Sources

    The Secret Diary of William Byrd of Westover, 1709-1712, ed. Louis B. Wright and Marion Tinling (Richmond: The Dietz Press, 1941)

    Linebaugh, Peter. 2006. The London hanged: crime and civil society in the eighteenth century. London: Verso.

  • 36 - The Secret Diary of William Byrd of Westover (1709)
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    Hello all! In this episode, we begin with Matt telling Grace and Alex about two books, Colonel Parke of Virginia: "The Greatest Hector in the Town" by Helen Hill Miller on Byrd's incredible father-in-law, Daniel Parke, and Perry of London: A Family and a Firm on the Seaborne Frontier, 1615–1753 on the Perry tobacco merchant family. Then, a discussion on the January 6 Capitol riots in the context of Bacon's Rebellion. Then we discuss the first year of William Byrd's Secret Diary, from 1709, with special attention to his behavior toward his slaves, servants, and other subordinates.

    Sources

    The Secret Diary of William Byrd of Westover, 1709-1712, ed. Louis B. Wright and Marion Tinling (Richmond: The Dietz Press, 1941

    Price, Jacob M. Perry of London: a Family and a Firm on the Seaborne Frontier, 1615-1753. Harvard University Press, 1992.

    Miller, Helen Hill. 1989. Colonel Parke of Virginia: the greatest hector in the town : a biography. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

    Rice, James D. 2012. Tales from a revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the transformation of early America. New York City: Oxford University Press.

    Washburn, Wilcomb E. 1957. The Governor and the rebel: a history of Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia. Chapel Hill: Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture at Williamsburg by the University of North Carolina Press.

  • Welcome to Season 2! William Byrd II Introduction, Historical Fiction, and Future Subjects
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    Hey everyone,

    Alex, Grace, and Matt have a catch up chat to kick off the new season. We discuss William Byrd II's secret diaries and example as a Virginia colonial gentleman, historical fiction, and preview what titles we'll be covering this year.

  • *UNLOCKED* Orwell|er - 5 - 'England Your England' - The Lion & The Unicorn Part 1 (1941)
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    Originally released for patrons March 14. Part two will be unlocked soon and part three is available now for members at patreon.com/literaryhangover

    Hey patrons! Social distancing has upended our scheduled plans for Aphra Behn's "Widow Ranter" with Grace, so Alex and I decided to return to Orwell|er with the first installment of Orwell's "The Lion and The Unicorn," titled "England Your England."

    This is an essay written at the height of the WWII blitz bombing of Britain by Orwell from London. The first line, "As I write, highly civilized human beings are flying overhead, trying to kill me," begins an immediately controversial argument in response to nationalism prevailing across the world and attempts to reframe patriotism as compatible, and in fact a component of, a socialist revolution. This episode is particulalry relevent in our capitalism-discrediting pandemic. Is there really such a thing as "national character." Is bourgouis democracy the same as totalitarianism? The difficulty of working class international consciousness. The increasingly evident and decadent stupidity of the ruling class. Are they dumb or traitors? American billionaires as ruthless. The place of the intelligentsia in the empire. Orwell predicts the rise, but not fall, of suburbia.

    Sources:

    Main source: Alex Hyde-White's narration of "Essays" by Orwell, 2019 via Audible.

    Bounds, Philip. 2009. Orwell and Marxism: the political and cultural thinking of George Orwell. London: I.B. Tauris.

    Claeys, Gregory. 1985; "The Lion and the Unicorn", Patriotism, and Orwell's Politics. The Review of Politics, Vol. 47, No. 2 (Apr., 1985), pp. 186-211

  • 35 - 'A Journal of the Plague Year' by Daniel Defoe (1722)
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    This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover

    Also subscribe to twitch.tv/literaryhangover for the study hall sessions!

    Hi everybody, Alex, Grace and I are back with an episode that will not really help you get your mind off of coronavirus! Today, Daniel Defoe's 'A Journal of the Plague Year,' a fictionalized journal set in the 1665 plague in London.

    Foucault's Political (order) and Literary (anarchy) "dreams" of the Plague. The surveillance state and public health. Fuedalism wasn't any better for workers than capitalism. The Defoe theme of the bourgeois barricading and provisioning himself in a dangerous environment. Daniel Defoe, Data Journalist. Killing watchmen. The economic pause of the plague. Rural/urban divides and cooperation.

    Sources:

    Wagner, Martin. "Defoe, Foucault, and the Politics of the Plague." SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 57, no. 3 (2017): 501-519.

    Foucault, Michel, 1926-1984. Discipline And Punish : the Birth of the Prison.

    Librivox narration.

  • 34 - 'The Widow Ranter, or, the History of Bacon in Virginia' by Aphra Behn (1689)
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    Best wishes to everyone dealing with pandemic bs.

    Full play text here:

    https://www.gutenberg.org/files/27273/27273-h/widow.html

    Grace, Alex, and Matt are back with another Aphra Behn work, this time her posthumously performed 1689 play "The Widow Ranter, or, the History of Bacon in Virginia." We discuss her role as a tory propagandist and as a spy rewriting recent history to glorify the heroic individual. The righteous Levellers and "delegating" the power of the people. Behn makes Bacon an Indian lover and not hater. Semernia and Cockacoeske. Bacon not a populist. The drunk colonial judiciary. Defending inheritances you recognize as unjust. The Widow Ranter as a feminist libertine ideal. Behn's lasting fidelity to hierarchy.

    Sources:

    Linebaugh, Peter, and Marcus Rediker. 2000. The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic. Boston: Beacon Press.

    Brown, Kathleen M. 1996. Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia.

    MOWRY, MELISSA. ""PAST REMEMBRANCE OR HISTORY": APHRA BEHN'S "THE WIDDOW RANTER", OR, HOW THE COLLECTIVE LOST ITS HONOR." ELH 79, no. 3 (2012): 597-621. Accessed April 4, 2020. jstor.org/stable/23256768.

    Pulsipher, Jenny Hale. "The Widow Ranter and Royalist Culture in Colonial Virginia." Early American Literature 39, no. 1 (2004): 41-66. doi:10.1353/eal.2004.0016.

    Rice, James D. 2013. Tales from a revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the transformation of Early America.

    Washburn, Wilcomb E. 1957. The Governor and the rebel, a history of Bacon's rebellion in Virginia. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

  • 33 - 'The History of Colonel Nathaniel Bacon's Rebellion' by Ebenezer Cook (1728)
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    This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover

    Alex and I return with another poem from the poet laureat of colonial Maryland, Ebenezer Cook, this time his narrative of Bacon's Rebellion(pdf).

    How memory-holed is Bacon's Rebellion? The false promise of promotional literature and the headright system. Economic anxiety and indian hating. Trade disputes, theft, jurisdiction, and the start of the rebellion. Bacon seeing no difference between friend and enemy indians. The spectre of Cromwell. George Washington's great grandfather: war criminal. Nathaniel Bacon, failson, scammer, world-traveler. Defense spending boondoggles and paying your taxes in tobacco. Selling guns to indians. Bacon's alliance/battle with Posseclay and the Occaneechees. Who's side is Cook on? Bacon uses loyalist women as a human shield, is more "Blue Lives Matter" than DSA. Bacon's bloody flux and his surviving rebellion. The merchant, Captain Grantham's, dirty trick.

    @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech

    @LitHangover

    References:

    Rice, James D. 2012. Tales from a revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the transformation of early America. New York City: Oxford University Press.

    Schmidt, Ethan A. 2016. The divided dominion: social conflict and Indian hatred in early Virginia.

    Washburn, Wilcomb E. 1972. The Governor and the rebel; a history of Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia. New York: Norton.

  • Reading "Bacon's Rebellion" by Ebenezer Cook (1731)

    This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover

    My narration of Ebenezer Cook's 1731 poem, "The History of Colonel Nathaniel Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia. Done into Hudibrastic Verse, from an old MS," which gives a pro-loyalist and anti-Bacon view common prior to the American Revolution, in the Hudibrastic style of his earlier "Sot-Weed Factor."

    This will be the subject of the next episode.

    Link to the text:

    https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/evans/N02853.0001.001/1:3?rgn=div1;view=fulltext

  • Reading 'The Sot-Weed Factor' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)
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    This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover

    Here's my reading of the satirical poem, The Sot-weed Factor: or, A Voyage to Maryland, by Ebenezer Cook (1708), as discussed in episode 32. Thanks for your support.